Modern learning routines enhance student engagement

One of my goals in the classroom is to create the learning conditions that lead to engaged students who are thoughtfully and actively taking their learning to the ‘next level’ as they discover more about the subject area and about who they are as learners.

I have been using different ways to gauge my effectiveness in achieving this goal. One such way is through fostering student voice in their learning. I like to know what students are thinking, how they are processing the content we are learning together, how they can demonstrate their learning through innovative examples of application and synthesis. Our use of individual blogs has been very helpful in this. I ask myself how I can design learning situations that foster creativity in learning which, I believe, will lead to higher levels of engagement (you can read more of my thinking about that here). How do I help students practice and reveal their ability in using those essential literacy skills, or 21st fluencies, that will help them succeed in today’s global environment? Ultimately, I want to emphasize the development of thinking about content rather than simply focusing on the details of content as we engage in learning in the classroom. (You can read more about this distinction here.)

With this in mind, I was thankful for the post about modern learning routines that can help reveal student thinking in the classroom. Silvia Tolisano reviewed 5 great modern learning routines that promote learning as well as revealing student thinking. You can read about them here. In list form:

  1. read – write – comment
  2. learn – reflect – share
  3. contribute – feedback – grow
  4. watch – do – teach
  5. document – present – disseminate

Not only does each routine engage students in active thinking about content, each routine also equips students with skills for content creation. More importantly, each routine helps reveal what students are thinking, and apply this thinking, in an authentic context and manner.

i like her suggestion that we need to encourage students to be transparent with their work. (This is a good reminder for us as teachers, too, so that we can grow and develop as members of a professional learning community.) In particular, each routine requires action on the part of the student.

Note some of the verbs of modern learning in action:

  • comment
  • share
  • contribute
  • teach
  • disseminate

These are just a few verbs/activities that hint of student engagement in their learning, of routines that I am integrating more and more into my teaching with the goal of fostering a vibrant learning culture.

For example, I have been working with my students this week to provide authentic feedback on each other’s blog rather than the simple encouraging comments of “Way to go!” or “I agree.” I am trying to help them share their thinking in response to their classmates’ posts.

  • “What connections can you make that could further the ideas of the post?”
  • “What new ideas did your classmate share that you hadn’t thought of before?”
  • “To what extent do you agree or disagree with the main idea of the post”?

Through this process I am trying to help my students understand the value of their own contribution to someone else’s learning. I am also trying to help them be open to the positive impact of feedback from others on their own posts. Through comment modeling and providing time to read everyone’s blog, we are fostering a greater appreciation of learning together. What I have noticed is that the students are actively engaged as they support each other.

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